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The Suez Canal is located on which continent?

Question:

The Suez Canal is located on which continent?

Suez Canal

The Suez Canal is an artificial waterway that is approximately 120 miles in length. It was originally built by the Universal Maritime Suez Canal Company, but is now managed by the Suez Canal Authority.

Answer and Explanation:

The Suez Canal is located between Africa and Asia. In fact, it separates the two continents with an artificial waterway that was built between 1859…

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Causes, Timeline & Effects of the Suez Crisis

from History 107: World Conflicts Since 1900

Chapter 5
/ Lesson 3


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Suez Canal

canal, Egypt
Written By:

  • William B. Fisher
  • Charles Gordon Smith
See Article History

Alternative Title:
Qanāt al-Suways

Suez Canal, Arabic Qanāt al-Suways, sea-level waterway running north-south across the Isthmus of Suez in Egypt to connect the Mediterranean and the Red seas. The canal separates the African continent from Asia , and it provides the shortest maritime route between Europe and the lands lying around the Indian and western Pacific oceans. It is one of the world’s most heavily used shipping lanes. The canal extends 120 miles (193 km) between Port Said (Būr Saʿīd) in the north and Suez in the south, with dredged approach channels north of Port Said, into the Mediterranean, and south of Suez. The canal does not take the shortest route across the isthmus , which is only 75 miles (121 km). Instead, it utilizes several lakes: from north to south, Lake Manzala (Buḥayrat al-Manzilah), Lake Timsah (Buḥayrat al-Timsāḥ), and the Bitter Lakes—Great Bitter Lake (Al-Buḥayrah al-Murrah al-Kubrā) and Little Bitter Lake (Al-Buḥayrah al-Murrah al-Ṣughrā). The Suez Canal is an open cut, without locks , and, though extensive straight lengths occur, there are eight major bends. To the west of the canal is the low-lying delta of the Nile River , and to the east is the higher, rugged, and arid Sinai Peninsula . Prior to construction of the canal (completed in 1869), the only important settlement was Suez, which in 1859 had 3,000 to 4,000 inhabitants. The rest of the towns along its banks have grown up since, with the possible exception of Al-Qanṭarah.

  • Suez Canal
    Suez CanalShips in the Suez Canal in Egypt. One of the world’s most important shipping lanes, the Suez Canal connects the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea.© Oleksandr Kalinichenko/Shutterstock.com
  • The Suez Canal.
    The Suez Canal.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
Read More on This Topic

Canal along a street in Colmar, France.

canals and inland waterways: The Suez Canal

The Isthmus of Suez so obviously provided a short sea route from the Mediterranean to the Indian Ocean and beyond as against the sea voyage around Africa that a canal was dug in antiquity; it fell into disuse, was frequently restored, and finally…

Physical features

Geology

The Isthmus of Suez , the sole land bridge between the continents of Africa and Asia, is of relatively recent geologic origin. Both continents once formed a single large continental mass, but during the Paleogene and Neogene periods (about 66 to 2.6 million years ago) the great fault structures of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aqaba developed, with the opening and subsequent drowning of the Red Sea trough as far as the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Aqaba. In the succeeding Quaternary Period (about the past 2.6 million years), there was considerable oscillation of sea level , leading finally to the emergence of a low-lying isthmus that broadened northward to a low-lying open coastal plain. There the Nile delta once extended farther east—as a result of periods of abundant rainfall coincident with the Pleistocene Epoch (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago)—and two river arms, or distributaries, formerly crossed the northern isthmus, one branch reaching the Mediterranean Sea at the narrowest point of the isthmus and the other entering the sea some 9 miles (14.5 km) east of present Port Said.

Physiography

Topographically, the Isthmus of Suez is not uniform. There are three shallow water-filled depressions: Lake Manzala, Lake Timsah, and the Bitter Lakes; though distinguished as Great and Little, the Bitter Lakes form one continuous sheet of water. A number of more-resistant bands of limestone and gypsum obtrude in the south of the isthmus, and another significant feature is a narrow valley leading from Lake Timsah southwestward toward the middle Nile delta and Cairo . The isthmus is composed of marine sediments, coarser sands, and gravels deposited in the early periods of abundant rainfall, Nile alluvium (especially to the north), and windblown sands.

When first opened in 1869, the canal consisted of a channel barely 26 feet (8 metres) deep, 72 feet (22 metres) wide at the bottom, and 200 to 300 feet (61 to 91 metres) wide at the surface. To allow ships to pass each other, passing bays were built every 5 to 6 miles (8 to 10 km). Construction involved the excavation and dredging of 97 million cubic yards (74 million cubic metres) of sediments. Between 1870 and 1884 some 3,000 groundings of ships occurred because of the narrowness and tortuousness of the channel. Major improvements began in 1876, and, after successive widenings and deepenings, the canal by the 1960s had a minimum width of 179 feet (55 metres) at a depth of 33 feet (10 metres) along its banks and a channel depth of 40 feet (12 metres) at low tide . Also in that period, passing bays were greatly enlarged and new bays constructed, bypasses were made in the Bitter Lakes and at Al-Ballāḥ, stone or cement cladding and steel piling for bank protection were almost entirely completed in areas particularly liable to erosion , tanker anchorages were deepened in Lake Timsah, and new berths were dug at Port Said to facilitate the grouping of ships in convoy.

Plans that had been made in 1964 for further enlargement were overtaken by the Arab-Israeli war of June 1967, during which the canal was blocked. The canal remained inoperative until June 1975, when it was reopened and improvements were recommenced. In 2015 the Egyptian government finished a nearly $8.5 billion project to upgrade the canal and significantly increase its capacity; nearly 18 miles (29 km) were added to its original length of 102 miles (164 km).

The economy

Operation

In 1870, the canal’s first full year of operation, there were 486 transits, or fewer than 2 per day. In 1966 there were 21,250, an average of 58 per day, with net tonnage increasing from some 437,000 long tons (444,000 metric tons) in 1870 to about 274,000,000 long tons (278,400,000 metric tons). By the mid-1980s the number of daily transits had fallen to an average of 50, but net annual tonnage was about 350,000,000 long tons (355,600,000 metric tons). In 2014 there were 17,148 transits with a net annual tonnage of about 947,800,000 long tons (963,000,000 metric tons).

aircraft carrier; Suez Canal
aircraft carrier; Suez CanalThe USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, crossing the Suez Canal.Purestock/age fotostock

The original canal did not permit two-way traffic, and ships would stop in a passing bay to allow the passage of ships in the other direction. Transit time then averaged 40 hours, but by 1939 it had been reduced to 13 hours. A system of convoys was adopted in 1947, consisting of one northbound and two southbound per day. Transit time went up to 15 hours in 1967 despite convoying, reflecting the great growth in tanker traffic at that time. With some enlargement of the canal, transit time since 1975 has ranged from 11 to 16 hours. Upon entering the canal at Port Said or Suez, ships are assessed for tonnage and cargo (passengers have ridden without charge since 1950) and are handled by one or two pilots for actual canal transit, which is increasingly controlled by radar . Southbound convoys moor at Port Said, Al-Ballāḥ, Lake Timsah, and Al-Kabrīt, where there are bypasses that allow northbound convoys to proceed without stopping. In August 2015 a new 22-mile (35-km) expansion running parallel to the main channel was opened, enabling two-way transit through the canal. The main channel was deepened to allow for the passage of larger ships. The expansion project, launched by Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi in 2014, was part of an effort to boost Egypt’s economy.

The nature of traffic has greatly altered, especially because of the enormous growth in shipments of crude oil and petroleum products from the Persian Gulf since 1950. In 1913 the oil in northbound traffic amounted to 291,000 long tons (295,700 metric tons), whereas in 1966 it amounted to 166,000,000 long tons (168,700,000 metric tons). The closure of the canal from 1967 to 1975 led to the use of large oil tankers on the route around the Cape of Good Hope and prompted the development of the Sumed pipeline from Suez to Alexandria , which opened in 1977. Since 1975 the increased size of tankers—the largest of which cannot use the canal—and the development of sources of crude oil in areas outside of the canal route (e.g., Algeria , Libya , Nigeria , the North Sea , and Mexico ) have reduced the canal’s importance in the international oil trade.

From an all-time peak of 984,000 in 1945, passenger traffic has declined to negligible numbers because of the competition from aircraft . Further decline in canal traffic resulted from a shift of Australasian trade from Europe to Japan and East Asia. Some movement of oil, however, from refineries in Russia , southern Europe, and Algeria has continued, chiefly to India, and the shipment of dry cargoes, including grain , ores , and metals , has increased. A more recent feature has been the growth of container and roll-on/roll-off (ro-ro) traffic through the canal, chiefly destined for the highly congested ports of the Red Sea and Persian Gulf.

Cargo ship in the Suez Canal near Ismailia, Egypt.
Cargo ship in the Suez Canal near Ismailia, Egypt.Hubertus Kauns/SuperStock

The major northbound cargoes consist of crude petroleum and petroleum products, coal , ores and metals, and fabricated metals, as well as wood, oilseeds and oilseed cake, and cereals. Southbound traffic consists of cement, fertilizers, fabricated metals, cereals, and empty oil tankers.

Read More on This Topic

Israel

Israel: The Suez War

The Israeli raids humiliated Egypt’s nationalist government headed by Gamal Abdel Nasser, a veteran of the 1948 war and leader of the group that had overthrown King Farouk in 1952. Nasser sought to lead the Arabs in expelling British and French imperial influence…

Communications and towns

Construction of the canal led to the growth of settlements in what had been, except for Suez, almost uninhabited arid territory. More than 70,000 acres (28,000 hectares) were brought under cultivation, and about 8 percent of the total population was engaged in agriculture, with approximately 10,000 commercial and industrial activities of various sizes. During the Suez Crisis in 1967, almost all the population was evacuated, and most of the settlements were severely damaged or destroyed during subsequent warfare. With the reopening of the canal in 1975, however, reconstruction of the area was begun, and most of the population had returned by 1978. Port Said was made a customs-free zone in 1975, and tax-free industrial zones have been established along the canal. The major urban centres are Port Said, with its east-bank counterpart, Būr Fuʾād; Ismailia (Al-Ismāʿīliyyah), on the north shore of Lake Timsah; and Suez, with its west-bank outport, Būr Tawfīq. Water for irrigation and for domestic and industrial use is supplied by the Nile via the Al-Ismāʿīliyyah Canal.

Port Said: Suez Canal Authority building
Port Said: Suez Canal Authority buildingSuez Canal Authority building, Port Said, Egypt.Daniel Csörföly

There are two roads from the pre-1967 period on the west bank. Ferries have largely been replaced by four underpasses: north of Suez, south and north of Lake Timsah, and at Al-Qanṭarah. From this last, a road continues along the east bank to Būr Fuʾād, and another runs eastward through the Sinai to Israel . Newer roads on the east bank run eastward to the Khutmiyyah, Giddi, and Mitla passes, which give access to the central Sinai. The railway on the west side of the canal was restored in the 1970s. In 1980 the Ahmad Hamdi road tunnel was opened, connecting Egypt proper with its governorate (muḥāfaẓah) of Shamāl Sīnāʾ . About 1 mile (1.6 km) of the tunnel passes beneath the canal itself. As part of the 2014 expansion proejct, the Egyptian government announced plans to build six new tunnels for both motor vehicles and trains. The project also includes the development of additional transportation infrastructure in the surrounding area and aims to reclaim some 4 million acres (1.6 million hectares) of land for cultivation.

History

Construction

The first canal in the region is thought to have been dug about 1850 bce, when an irrigation channel navigable at flood period was constructed into the Wadi Tumelat (Al-Ṭumaylāt), a dry river valley east of the Nile delta. Known as the Canal of the Pharaohs, that channel was extended by the Ptolemies via the Bitter Lakes as far as the Red Sea. From the region of Lake Timsah a northward arm appears to have reached a former branch of the Nile. Extended under the Romans (who called it Trajan’s Canal), neglected by the Byzantines , and reopened by the early Arabs, that canal was deliberately filled in by the ʿAbbāsid caliphs for military reasons in 775 ce. Throughout, the reason for those changes appears to have been to facilitate trade from the delta lands to the Red Sea rather than to provide a passage to the Mediterranean.

Venetians in the 15th century and the French in the 17th and 18th centuries speculated upon the possibility of making a canal through the isthmus. A canal there would make it possible for ships of their nations to sail directly from the Mediterranean to the Indian Ocean and so dispute the monopoly of the East Indian trade that had been won first by the Portuguese, then by the Dutch, and finally by the English, all of whom used the route around the Cape of Good Hope . Those schemes came to nothing.

It was not until the French occupation of Egypt (1798–1801) that the first survey was made across the isthmus. Napoleon personally investigated the remains of the ancient canal. J.M. Le Père, his chief lines-of-communication engineer, erroneously calculated that the level of the Red Sea was 33 feet (10 metres) above that of the Mediterranean and, therefore, that locks would be needed. Considering the adverse conditions under which the French surveyors worked and the prevailing belief in the disparity of levels of the two seas, the error was excusable, and Le Père’s conclusion was uncritically accepted by a succession of subsequent authors of canal projects. Studies for a canal were made again in 1834 and in 1846. In 1854 Ferdinand de Lesseps received an Act of Concession from the viceroy (khedive) of Egypt, Saʿīd Pasha , to construct a canal, and in 1856 a second act conferred on the Suez Canal Company (Compagnie Universelle du Canal Maritime de Suez) the right to operate a maritime canal for 99 years after completion of the work. Construction began in 1859 and took 10 years instead of the 6 that had been envisaged; climatic difficulties, a cholera epidemic in 1865, and early labour troubles all slowed down operations. An initial project was the cutting of a small canal (the Al-Ismāʾīliyyah) from the delta along the Wadi Tumelat, with a southern branch (now called the Al-Suways al-Ḥulwah Canal; the two canals combined were formerly called the Sweet Water Canal) to Suez and a northern one (Al-ʿAbbāsiyyah Canal) to Port Said . This supplied drinking water in an otherwise arid area and was completed in 1863.

At first, digging was done by hand with picks and baskets, peasants being drafted as forced labour . Later, dredgers and steam shovels operated by European labourers took over, and, as dredging proved cheaper than dry excavation, the terrain was artificially flooded and dredged wherever possible. Other than in the few areas where rock strata were met, the entire canal was driven through sand or alluvium. In August 1869 the waterway was completed, and it was officially opened with an elaborate ceremony on November 17.

Finance

The Suez Canal Company had been incorporated as an Egyptian joint-stock company with its head office in Paris. Despite much early official coolness, even hostility, on the part of Great Britain , Lesseps was anxious for international participation and offered shares widely. Only the French responded, however, buying 52 percent of the shares; of the remainder, 44 percent was taken up by Saʾīd Pasha. The first board of directors included representatives of 14 countries.

In 1875, financial troubles compelled the new viceroy, Ismāʾīl Pasha , to sell his holding, which (at the instigation of the prime minister , Benjamin Disraeli ) was at once bought by the British government. Until that year the shares had remained below their issue price of 500 francs each. With the British purchase (at 568 francs each), steady appreciation took place, to more than 3,600 francs in 1900.

Originally allocated 15 percent of the net profits, Egypt later relinquished the percentage and, after the sale of Ismāʿīl’s 176,602 shares, remained unrepresented on the board of directors until 1949, when it was, in effect, reinstated as a board member and allotted 7 percent of gross profits. In that year it was also agreed that 90 percent of new clerical jobs and 80 percent of technical appointments would be offered to Egyptians and that the Canal Company would provide hospitals, schools, and other amenities.

In 1956, 13 years before the concession was due to expire, the canal was nationalized by Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser , precipitating the Suez Crisis . Since then the Egyptian government has exercised complete control through its Suez Canal Authority (SCA), though the original company (now GDF Suez) continues in France as a multinational utilities company.

International status

Although the canal was built to serve, and profit from, international trade , its international status remained undefined for many years. In 1888 the major maritime powers at the time (except Great Britain) signed the Convention of Constantinople , which declared that the canal should be open to ships of all nations in times of both peace and war. In addition, the convention forbade acts of hostility in the waters of the canal and the construction of fortifications on its banks. Great Britain did not sign the convention until 1904.

The history of international use of the canal during wartime includes denial of passage to Spanish warships during the Spanish-American War of 1898 and permission of passage for a squadron of the Russian navy during the Russo-Japanese War in 1905 and for Italian vessels during Italy’s invasion of Ethiopia in 1935–36. Theoretically, the canal was open to all belligerents during World Wars I and II , but the naval and military superiority of the Allied forces denied effective use of the canal to the shipping of Germany and its allies.

Following the armistice between Israel and its Arab opponents in 1949, Egypt denied use of the canal to Israel and to all ships trading with Israel. The first of two canal closings occurred during the Suez Crisis of 1956–57, after Israel attacked Egyptian forces, and French and British troops occupied part of the canal zone. Several ships were trapped within the canal during that blockade and were unable to leave until the north end was reopened in January 1957. The second closing was a consequence of the Arab-Israeli war of June 1967, during and after which the canal was the scene of much fighting between Egypt and Israel and for several years formed the front line between the two armies. Egypt physically barricaded both ends of the canal, and 15 ships, known as the “Yellow Fleet” for the desert sand they slowly accumulated, were trapped in the canal’s Great Bitter Lake for the entire duration of the war. The international crews of the anchored ships provided each other with mutual support and camaraderie , though by 1969 most of the crew members had been allowed to leave. With the reopening of the canal in June 1975 and the signing of a peace treaty between Egypt and Israel in 1979, all ships (including those of Israeli registration) again had access to the waterway, though only 2 of the 15 trapped vessels were able to leave under their own power.

Suez Crisis, 1956.
Suez Crisis, 1956.Stock footage courtesy The WPA Film Library

William B. Fisher
Charles Gordon Smith

Learn More in these related Britannica articles:

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    …from the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869. The strategic importance of that waterway cannot be overstated. It was the gateway to India and East Asia and hence a vital interest nonpareil for the British Empire. When the khedive of Egypt defaulted on loans owed to France and Britain,…

ADDITIONAL MEDIA

  • The Suez Canal.

More About Suez Canal

27 references found in Britannica articles

Assorted References

    • major reference
      • In canals and inland waterways: The Suez Canal
    • colonial imperialism
      • In British Empire: Dominance and dominions
      • In Western colonialism: The Europeans in North Africa
    • international status
      • In canals and inland waterways: Administration
    • Yemeni economy
      • In Yemen: Trade

    history

      Arab-Israeli Wars

        • Israel
          • In Israel: The Suez War
        • Suez Crisis
          • In Suez Crisis
        • Yom Kippur War
          • In 20th-century international relations: Palestinian terrorism and diplomacy
        • Egypt
          • In Egypt
          • In Egypt: ʿAbbās I and Saʿīd, 1848-63

        Additional Reading

        External Websites

        • European Space Agency: Earth Online – Suez Canal, Egypt
        • Tour Egypt – Suez Canal
        • ThoughtCo. – Connecting the Red Sea with the Mediterranean
        Britannica Websites
        Articles from Britannica Encyclopedias for elementary and high school students.
        • Suez Canal – Children’s Encyclopedia (Ages 8-11)
        • Suez Canal – Student Encyclopedia (Ages 11 and up)

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        Related Topics
        • Africa
        • Egypt
        • Canals and inland waterways
        • Suez Crisis
        • Muḥammad ʿAbd al-Munʿim Riyāḍ
        • North Africa campaigns
        • Ferdinand, viscount de Lesseps
        • Middle East
        • Al-Firdan Bridge
        • David Seymour

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