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What are some humorous topics for Project 7 in Toastmasters?

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3 Answers

Shaik Dawood Ihsan

Shaik Dawood Ihsan , Table Topics Speech – 1st Runner Up, Division Level.

When attempting a project from any of the Communication manuals, make sure you understand its objectives. CC7 is all about research and providing appropriate stats and facts to support your viewpoints.

I have heard a few CC7 speeches and a few toastmasters might agree that a CC7 project because of its objectives might not turn out to be a crowd puller. Frankly speaking, in my two and a half years in TM i have never seen anyone attempt a Humorous speech for a CC7. Kudos to what you are going to attempt.

I believe Humor comes from Pain. Think of the things or situations that have put you in trouble or made you suffer. It can be anything from the daily crowded bus that you take to office to the people who annoy you.

For Example:

If you take a crowded bus to office and want to give a speech on it, maybe you can research on the ways that people commute to office, the number of people who take buses to work in your country and a few other areas that will support your viewpoints. Get your stats and facts. You can then present them in a humorous way.

I attempted a CC7 on EGGS. Yes, EGGS. I titled my speech Egg-xactly. My speech had the below elements:

  • What came first? The egg or the chicken?
  • Is Egg vegetarian or non vegetarian?
  • Consumption of eggs.
  • Health benefits.
  • My love for eggs
  • I even had a raw egg on stage.

It had a bit of humour sprinkled but not the ROFL humour.

Remember a CC7 speech meeting its objectives but not Humorous is much better than a Humorous CC7 without meeting its objectives. If you can meet your objectives with Humour that my friend would be great and unique 🙂

ALL THE BEST!!!

DawooD

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Uday Kiran

Uday Kiran , Member at Toastmasters International (2015-present)

Thanks for the question

It reminded me my CC7 speech which was about the stats derived from Matrimonial sites…

It was humorous when I shared the stats of what percentage of women are interested in Men in Same Profession

Percentage of Women actually have no issue with the complexion of Men

Funny thing was only 20% of women are interested to marry a guy in sales profession (I am a sales professional)

Finally concluded how arranged marriages in India are successful (90%) over love marriages

I agree we can research and make a speech for project 7 which would be humorous

Hope it helps

Ankit Agrawal

Ankit Agrawal , Developer

You already know your humorous Speech topic, that is hidden in one of problems of your life. You just have to add some positive points on that with spice of humor .

You can take help from below link

http://www.jaipurtoastmaster.com…

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Comments: 18
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Article Category:
Speechwriting

Toastmasters Speech 7: Research Your Topic

by Andrew Dlugan
Published: Sep 7th, 2010


Toastmasters Speech 7: Research Your Topic

Imagine that you are writing your next great speech. As you scour your mind for the fact that will clinch your case, you will discover one of two things: either you know it, or you don’t.

Most of the time, you won’t know every piece of information you need to make a compelling argument, but you can find it.

The seventh Toastmasters speech project encourages you to go beyond your own knowledge and opinions, and fill in the gaps with various forms of research.

This article of the Toastmasters Speech Series examines the primary goals of this project, provides tips and techniques, and links to numerous sample speeches.

Why is This Speech Important?

The Toastmasters Speech Series
  1. The Ice Breaker
  2. Organize Your Speech
  3. Get to the Point
  4. How To Say It
  5. Your Body Speaks
  6. Vocal Variety
  7. Research Your Topic
  8. Get Comfortable with Visual Aids (coming next)
  9. Persuade with Power
  10. Inspire Your Audience

The objectives for this speech project are to conduct appropriate research and then incorporate this research into your speech to provide support for your key arguments.

Tips and Techniques

1. Don’t know what to research? Anticipate audience questions.

As you take your speech from an idea to an outline, and then to a rough draft, ask yourself the following question: “If I delivered this speech as is, what question would my audience have?” If you don’t have the answer (due to your subject expertise), then you’ve got to research it. Then, once you incorporate this new research into your speech, ask yourself the question again. Repeat a few times until you’ve covered the key questions.

2. Use websites, but use them wisely.

There’s a wealth of information out there, and you’d be stupid not to utilize it.

But don’t be lazy when choosing your sources. I’m a huge fan of Wikipedia and I have used it for early speech research. However, I wouldn’t always trust my reputation as a speaker on the information provided by an encyclopedia that anyone can edit. Instead, look for primary sources. For example:

  • Speaking about the health benefits of apples? Seek out a nutrition website , not a chat room.
  • Speaking about high-definition televisions? Grab specifications from the  manufacturer website , not Twitter.
  • Speaking about the Oregon Dunes? Head to the US Forest Service website , not Facebook.

The quality of your source matters. (See this article about speaking ethos .)

3. Don’t use only websites.

Don’t include statistics just because they are jaw-dropping. Include them because they improve the strength of your argument.

Sure, the Internet has lots of answers, but not all of them. You might also try:

  • Books, newspapers, magazines, etc.
  • Go to the business, the attraction, the town hall meeting, the park, the beach, the mall, or whatever location allows you to gather first-hand knowledge.
  • Interview an expert, whether in-person, on the phone, or via email.
  • Conduct a survey yourself.

You will raise your credibility by going beyond the “easy” or “expected” source (the web).

4. Keep it relevant.

Remember the lesson learned in speech 3 : every element of your speech must reinforce your purpose.

Don’t include statistics just because they are jaw-dropping. Include them because they improve the strength of your argument.

Similarly, don’t include quotations from a famous person or source with the intent of name-dropping. Include them because they express one of your arguments more succinctly than you could otherwise express it.

5. Cite your sources.

As mentioned in a previous article about improving your persuasiveness :

A statistic may be accurate, but without citing a source, your audience may dismiss it. By citing a source, you tip the scale towards believability.

6. Provide necessary context.

Facts, statistics, quotations, and whatever else you discover in your research can rarely be presented all alone. In most cases, you’ll need to wrap your research by providing some context, and explaining the relevance.

For example, suppose that your research tells you that a certain exercise burns 800 calories of energy. Depending on the knowledge of your audience, this may be a meaningless number. To give it meaning, you have to provide the context. e.g. 800 calories is one third of the recommended daily caloric intake. (Note that this value depends on gender, weight, etc. Choose a value which is representative of your audience… or provide a range of values.)

7. Don’t cram too much in.

Avoid the temptation to just collect an array of statistics and then spew them at your audience, one after the other. Your speech should be supported by your research; it should not be the research.

But what if you have more research than you can reasonably fit…?

8. Surprise your audience with a handout.

In your speech, you only have time to refer to the most relevant research. But a great way to follow up your speech (all speeches, but especially for this project) is to provide additional research on a handout. A single page is often enough. It’s a good place to list websites or other sources, or any other information which leads your audience towards your call-to-action.

Your speech should be supported by your research; it should not be the research.

What I Did for Speech 7

I researched options for cutting the fuel costs for your car, and presented these to my audience.

I included the following research in my speech:

  • A chart showing gas prices for a 3-year period (on gasbuddy.com ). I presented this as a chart early in the talk to illustrate how drastic the overall change has been to set the context for my talk.
  • The sum of federal, provincial, and local (transit) taxes that are included in the gas price. (Where I live, taxes add up to one third of the total price!)
  • The range of fuel efficiency among different classes of vehicles (a factor of six between a Toyota Prius hybrid and a Dodge Ram truck), and also between vehicles in the same class (varies from five to forty percent).
  • The fuel efficiency difference between a vehicle which is properly maintained, and one which is not (up to 13%).
  • The fuel costs associated with running your air conditioning rather than opening your windows (up to 10%, depending on your speed).
  • Fuel savings from driving style (up to 25%) e.g. maintaining a steady speed rather than constantly speeding and braking.
  • Fuel savings from streamlining your car (up to 5%) by removing roof racks or heavy items from the trunk.
  • Fuel savings from buying at the “right” time of day (up to 5%).

Most of my research was done on various government, automotive, and consumer websites. I presented the sources as part of my talk. (Unfortunately, the links are dead now.)

For the “time of day” research, I compiled this myself by recording the price difference at the same gas station every day for one month when I drove by it several times per day (to and from work, etc.) On average, the gas was 5% cheaper in the evening relative to the morning price.

To make the research more meaningful, I also presented the dollar savings which could be realized for an average commuter in Greater Vancouver, where I live. ($632 a year!)

Toastmasters Speech 7 Examples

The Toastmasters Speech Series
  1. The Ice Breaker
  2. Organize Your Speech
  3. Get to the Point
  4. How To Say It
  5. Your Body Speaks
  6. Vocal Variety
  7. Research Your Topic
  8. Get Comfortable with Visual Aids (coming next)
  9. Persuade with Power
  10. Inspire Your Audience

Here are a few sample video speeches which may provide inspiration for you. As you watch them, ask yourself which elements of the speech were likely researched, how well was this researched material presented, and did it support the speaker’s arguments?

  • Sugar Blues by Kelly Cornell
    • Note how the speaker makes numbers more meaningful by comparing them to other values. Also, she uses teaspoons to aid understandability rather than the less commonly known grams. e.g.
      • Average American consumes more than 100 pounds of sugar every year, compared to 8 pounds of broccoli.
      • Lemon poppyseed Clif Bar has 21 grams of sugar (5 teaspoons).
        Chocolate glazed cake donut (Dunkin donuts) has 14 grams (3 teaspoons).
        16 ounce Starbucks frappucino has 44 grams of sugar (10 teaspoons). “That’s like eating 3 donuts!”
    • Although the speaker cites the USDA as the source for the 10 teaspoons/day recommendation, no other sources are cited through the speech. For example, who says Americans consume more than 100 pounds of sugar a year? Since the speaker is an authority herself (she is a nutrition counselor), citing her sources isn’t critical, but it would be good.
  • Adapt or Die – Income Diversification by Mary Ann
  • Let the Music Play by Ravi Mittal
  • The Monster that Ate Wall Street by Srinivas Ankareddy
  • The Hug Effect by Heather
  • The Federal Reserve by Frank
  • Things You Did or Did Not Know About Victoria by Matt
  • Some Like it Hot by Reuben
  • Fear of Rejection by Anonymous
  • Who gets more rebounds? by Jason Zhang

Next in the Toastmasters Speech Series

The next article in this series will examine Speech 8: Get Comfortable with Visual Aids.

Please share this…

This is one of a number of articles related to Toastmasters featured on Six Minutes.
Subscribe to Six Minutes for free to receive future articles.

Note: Six Minutes is not affiliated with or endorsed by Toastmasters International. Click here for more information about the relationship between the two.

Andrew Dlugan
is the editor and founder of Six Minutes . He teaches courses, leads seminars, coaches speakers, and strives to avoid Suicide by PowerPoint. He is an award-winning public speaker and speech evaluator. Andrew is a father and husband who resides in British Columbia, Canada.

Google+: Andrew Dlugan
Twitter: @6minutes


Image credit: Magnifying Glass by FreeImages.com/Ove Tøpfer ( license )

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Comments icon18 Comments

  1. Carrie says:

    May 4th, 2011

    I’d love to see you continue with this series, just three more. They have been very helpful as i progress through the first book.

    Reply

  2. Carol says:

    Mar 1st, 2012

    Really liking your help with theCompetent Communicator manual. Hope you finish the series. Realizing your website will be a great resource as when I start my MA in Communication Studies this Fall. Thank you so much!

    Reply

  3. Matt Zalot says:

    Mar 19th, 2012

    Are you going to do articles on CC speeches 8, 9, and 10?

    I’m doing the seventh speech now and like reading these columns before the writing begins.

    Reply

    1. Andrew Dlugan says:

      Mar 20th, 2012

      Yes, they are coming.

      Reply

      1. Jonathan McMillan says:

        Mar 4th, 2015

        I’m pretty late to the conversation and may have missed an update to this thread. Did you ever do articles on speeches 8, 9, and 10?

        Reply

  4. Samantha says:

    Aug 27th, 2012

    I have a question: any tips for remembering the speech? As the material is full of numbers and is quite dry, it’s hard to memorize it.

    Thank you!

    Reply

    1. Andrew Dlugan says:

      Aug 28th, 2012

      Samantha:
      [1] There’s no magic… rehearsing several times over is probably the best advice.
      [2] There’s nothing wrong with using a note card to help you remember the numbers themselves (the idea is that you don’t want to read your speech, but if you have specific numbers you want to say, then glancing quickly at a note isn’t so bad)
      [3] If you still find there are too many statistics to remember, perhaps there are just too many statistics, period. Try reducing the number of statistics, and focus instead on conveying each statistic in the best way possible. This may help: http://sixminutes.dlugan.com/statistics-speech/
      Good luck!

      Reply

  5. Kumaran says:

    Feb 21st, 2013

    Hi Andrew,
    English is not my primary language, and I am trying my best to Improvise.

    Your articles on the 10 Speeches of CC of Toastmasters are really good.

    Please continue the series, and write more on the Get Comfortable with Visual Aids, Persuade with Power and Inspire Your Audience topics.

    Thanks.

    With regards,
    Kumaran (from the third world)

    Reply

  6. Dolly says:

    Apr 7th, 2013

    Thank you, Andrew, for your articles. I’m not a native speaker and they are really helpful.

    Dolly (Mongolia)

    Reply

  7. Lindy says:

    Jul 3rd, 2013

    Curious…with many statistics, quotes,, and specific facts, how does one remember all this without reading them directly from notes? We don’t have available a flip chart, white board, or poster support means. Power point is unrealiable and seems to seldom work. Any suggestions?

    Reply

    1. Melissa says:

      Jul 23rd, 2015

      There was a great article in the a recent Toastmaster magazine about data (women was lead of Alumni relations @ Cornell).
      Key points I remember.
      Less data is better.

      Reply

  8. Gerry says:

    Aug 18th, 2013

    Hi, Don: I have been a Toastmaster “forever,” however I still find it difficult to force myself to give a prepared speech. Anyway, after many years I am repeating the Basic Manual so find your website a valuable resource for suggestions, ideas and reference. So thanks for “being here.” –Gerry

    Reply

  9. Ayl says:

    Nov 10th, 2013

    I find the Toastmaster Speech Series really helpful. This is my go to website every time I prepare for my Competent Communicator Speech Projects. The tips, techniques and reference links you put in each of the article are really useful.
    I’m currently on my speech project 7 and very thankful that your article for this project is available.
    I look forward to seeing your articles for speech projects 8, 9 and 10 – hopefully soon for number 8.

    Reply

  10. Teah says:

    Feb 19th, 2014

    Great article! I hope to see more!!!

    Reply

  11. Dhenn Espiritu says:

    Jan 8th, 2017

    Awesome! very helpful for my next speech!

    Reply

  12. namrata says:

    Apr 21st, 2017

    Hi Andrew,
    I liked your articles on toastmasters speeches. When are you going to write for Project 8, Get comfortable with visual aids?
    Looking forward to read it.

    Regards,
    Namrata

    Reply

    1. John says:

      Nov 21st, 2017

      Same! Will you finish with projects 8-10??

      Reply

  13. rebecca iop says:

    Oct 15th, 2017

    i come here for help on my Toastmaster speech projects. wish you had done tips for project 8-10 🙁

    Great website.

    thnks

    Reply

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Public Speaking

What are some humorous topics for Project 7 in Toastmasters?

The must-play city building game of the year.
Journey through historical ages in this award-winning city building game.
Play Now at forgeofempires.com
3 Answers

Shaik Dawood Ihsan

Shaik Dawood Ihsan , Table Topics Speech – 1st Runner Up, Division Level.

When attempting a project from any of the Communication manuals, make sure you understand its objectives. CC7 is all about research and providing appropriate stats and facts to support your viewpoints.

I have heard a few CC7 speeches and a few toastmasters might agree that a CC7 project because of its objectives might not turn out to be a crowd puller. Frankly speaking, in my two and a half years in TM i have never seen anyone attempt a Humorous speech for a CC7. Kudos to what you are going to attempt.

I believe Humor comes from Pain. Think of the things or situations that have put you in trouble or made you suffer. It can be anything from the daily crowded bus that you take to office to the people who annoy you.

For Example:

If you take a crowded bus to office and want to give a speech on it, maybe you can research on the ways that people commute to office, the number of people who take buses to work in your country and a few other areas that will support your viewpoints. Get your stats and facts. You can then present them in a humorous way.

I attempted a CC7 on EGGS. Yes, EGGS. I titled my speech Egg-xactly. My speech had the below elements:

  • What came first? The egg or the chicken?
  • Is Egg vegetarian or non vegetarian?
  • Consumption of eggs.
  • Health benefits.
  • My love for eggs
  • I even had a raw egg on stage.

It had a bit of humour sprinkled but not the ROFL humour.

Remember a CC7 speech meeting its objectives but not Humorous is much better than a Humorous CC7 without meeting its objectives. If you can meet your objectives with Humour that my friend would be great and unique 🙂

ALL THE BEST!!!

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Uday Kiran

Uday Kiran , Member at Toastmasters International (2015-present)

Thanks for the question

It reminded me my CC7 speech which was about the stats derived from Matrimonial sites…

It was humorous when I shared the stats of what percentage of women are interested in Men in Same Profession

Percentage of Women actually have no issue with the complexion of Men

Funny thing was only 20% of women are interested to marry a guy in sales profession (I am a sales professional)

Finally concluded how arranged marriages in India are successful (90%) over love marriages

I agree we can research and make a speech for project 7 which would be humorous

Hope it helps

Ankit Agrawal

Ankit Agrawal , Developer

You already know your humorous Speech topic, that is hidden in one of problems of your life. You just have to add some positive points on that with spice of humor .

You can take help from below link

http://www.jaipurtoastmaster.com…