Course Hero Logo
Course Hero Symbol

    • Find Study Resources

      • Main Menu
      • by School
      • by Subject

        Course Study Guides
      • by Book

        Literature Study Guides
        Infographics

      Get Instant Tutoring Help
      Earn by Contributing

      • Main Menu
      • Earn Free Access
      • Upload Documents
      • Refer Your Friends
      • Become a Tutor
      • Apply for Scholarship
    • For Educators

      Log in

      Sign up

    • app store button

      google play button



  • Find
    Study Resources

    • by School

    • by Subject

      • Course Study Guides

    • by Book

      • Literature Study Guides

      • Infographics



  • Get Instant
    Tutoring Help



  • Earn by
    Contributing

    • Earn Free Access

      Learn More >

    • Upload Documents

    • Refer Your Friends

    • Earn Money

    • Become a Tutor

    • Apply for Scholarship

  • Are you an educator?

  • Log in

  • Sign up

Johns Hopkins University

CHEM

CHEM 020.305

Chemistry

Hydrobromic acid becomes formula hydrophosphoric acid


  • Johns Hopkins University


  • CHEM 020.305

  • Test Prep


  • 21




  • 100%
    (1)
    1 out of 1 people found this document helpful

Info icon

This preview shows 2 out of 6 pages.

hydrobromic acid becomes
formula: _______________
hydrophosphoric acid becomes
formula: _______________
carbonic acid becomes
formula: _______________
nitric acid becomes
formula: _______________
c.
Exceptions to the above rules include:
o
“sulf” acids.
ex) H
2
SO
4 (aq)
.
Hydrogen sulfate becomes sulfuric
acid, not sulfic acid.
o
“phos” acids.
ex) H
3
PO
4 (aq)
.
Hydrogen phosphate becomes
phosphoric acid, not phosphic acid.
o
“COO” acids.
ex) CH
3
COOH
(aq)
.
The hydrogen is placed in the
formula after the formula of the negative ion.
(These are organic acids.)
4.
Irregular Formulas.
Some common elements and compounds have unusual
names or unique formulas which may not be predicted under ordinary
circumstances.
These special cases are best memorized.
a.
Polyatomic Molecular Elements:
H
2
, N
2
, O
2
and O
3
, halogens
2
, P
4
, S
8
These are elements because they can’t exist any more simply and are
molecules because they have more than 1 atom.
b. Common compounds:
Some of the most common compounds have special
names and do not follow the normal system of nomenclature.
These include:
hydrogen peroxide H
2
O
2 (l)
water
H
2
O
(l)
ammonia
NH
3 (g)
methane
CH
4 (g)
sucrose
C
12
H
22
O
11 (s)
methanol
CH
3
OH
(l)
ethanol
C
2
H
5
OH
(l)
hydrazine
N
2
H
4 (l)
phosphine
PH
3 (g)
Image of page 2

Info icon
Subscribe to view the full document.

K
2
SO
4
(s)
___________
Nomenclature Review Exercise
Complete the following table by supplying either the chemical formula or the
name of the substance.
Identify each substance as an ionic compound (i), a
molecular substance (m), or an acid (a).
i, m, a
Chemical Formula
Name
ex
I
NaCl
(s)
sodium chloride
1
CaCO
3(aq)
2
sodium bisulfate
3
sodium hydroxide
4
CaO
(s)
5
MgSO
4

7H
2
O
(aq)
6
carbon dioxide
7
acetic acid
8
calcium sulfate
9
Na
2
SiO
3(s)
10
Ca(HCO
3
)
2(s)
11
magnesium hydroxide
12
potassium chloride
13
sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate
14
sodium hypochlorite
15
Na
2
CO
3(aq)
16
HCl
(aq)
17
potassium nitrate
18
CuSO
4

5H
2
O
(aq)
19
magnesium oxide
20
KI
(aq)
21
H
2
SO
4
(aq)
22
silicon carbide
23
Ca(OH)
2(aq)
Image of page 3
i, m, a
Chemical Formula
Name
24
potassium hydroxide
25
S
8(s)
26
carbon tetrachloride
27
NH
4
Cl
(aq)
28
NH
4
OH
(aq)
29
SiO
2(s)
30
boric acid
31
NH
4
NO
3(aq)
32
ammonium sulfate
33
NaClO
3(aq)
34
calcium chloride
35
KMnO
4(s)
36
phosphoric acid
37
NaHSO
4(s)
38
tin (II) fluoride
39
FeSO
4(aq)
40
C
2
H
5
OH
(l)
41
CH
3
OH
(l)
42
methane
43
sucrose
44
diphosphorus pentaoxide
45
NaHCO
3(s)
46
lead (IV) oxide
47
water
48
dinitrogen monoxide
49
Na
2
SO
4

10H
2
O
(aq)
50
aluminum sulfate
51
AgNO
3(aq)
Image of page 4

Info icon
Subscribe to view the full document.

Math Needed for Chemistry 30
Unit Conversions
:
Using pg.3 of your Data Booklet or the back of the periodic table, convert the following
values.
Use factor analysis.
42.6 g = 42.6 g x
kg
= 0.0426 kg
1000 g
553.4 mg = ______________ g
0.043 mol/L = ____________mmol/L
16.3 ML = ______________ L
496 J = ______________ kJ
82.43 mol = ______________ kmol
Significant Digits:
Rules for Significant Digits
Adding/Subtracting:
least number of
decimal places
Multiplying/Dividing:
least number of
significant digits
pH:
only decimal places are significant digits
All written digits are considered to be significant
except leading zeros
Counted numbers (ex. moles, coefficients) are exact and are not considered in
determining sig digs.
Image of page 5
Image of page 6
You’ve reached the end of this preview.

  • Spring 08

  • Chemistry

  • Twitter Icon
  • Email Icon
  • URL Icon
    Share this link with a friend:


    Copied!


Report

Most Popular Documents for CHEM 020.305

  • Prev
  • Next

  • 1 pages
    polarity.png

    • polarity.png
    • Johns Hopkins University
    • CHEM 020.305

      Summer 2012

    polarity.png

  • 1 pages
    charles law b utanee.jpg

    • charles law b utanee.jpg
    • Johns Hopkins University
    • CHEM 020.305

      Summer 2012

    charles law b utanee.jpg

  • 1 pages
    methane.jpg

    • methane.jpg
    • Johns Hopkins University
    • CHEM 020.305

      Summer 2012

    methane.jpg

  • 15 pages
    2008Final

    • The melting temperature and the nature of the melting transition of an
    • Johns Hopkins University
    • CHEM 020.305

      Summer 2012

    2008Final

  • 11 pages
    2011finalexamKEY

    • 2011finalexamKEY
    • Johns Hopkins University
    • CHEM 020.305

      Summer 2012

    2011finalexamKEY

  • 1 pages
    butane gas .jpg

    • butane gas .jpg
    • Johns Hopkins University
    • CHEM 020.305

      Summer 2012

    butane gas .jpg

View
more

  • Bookmarked
    Chemistry

    [ document.course.dept_acro ] [ document.course.course_num ]

    [ document.title ]

    [ document.bookmarkTime ]

Chemistry

CHEM 020.305

Chemistry

Viewing now

Interested in Chemistry

?

Bookmark it to view later.

Bookmark Chemistry.

Bookmarked!

No bookmarked documents.



Bookmark this doc

Recently Viewed

Chemistry

[ document.course.dept_acro ] [ document.course.course_num ]

[ document.title ]

satisfaction guaranteed seal

Study on the go

  • Download the iOS

  • Download the Android app

Other Related Materials

97 pages
dfnk I.pdf

  • dfnk I.pdf
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • CHEM 30.101

    Fall 2009

dfnk I.pdf

55 pages
Lecture 3- Fundamentals

  • Eg 50 ml of a 20M solution contains 20 molL 0050L010 mol of solute 52 You also
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • CHEM AS.030.105

    Fall 2015

Lecture 3- Fundamentals

16 pages
Final Exam Review Guide 2013 KEY.doc

  • 1 Which intervals on the graph above indicate a change in kinetic energy AB C D
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • CHEM AS.030.105

    Fall 2011

Final Exam Review Guide 2013 KEY.doc

10 pages
2008exam2KEY

  • 2 Polysaccharides play important structural and energy storage roles in biology
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • CHEM 020.305

    Summer 2012

2008exam2KEY

15 pages
2008Final_KEY

  • Which of the following is likely to increase the fluidity of a membrane a
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • CHEM 020.305

    Summer 2012

2008Final_KEY

28 pages
Chapter 5

  • What is the correct formula for the product of the combination reaction between
  • Benedictine University
  • CHEM 101

    Fall 2013

Chapter 5

[ snackBarMessage ]

2/3

PREVIEWS LEFT

Sign up to access 24/7 study resources for your classes
Sign Up
Log in

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran
    Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana
    University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill
    Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern